Cannabinoids Exert Neuroprotective Effects

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An abstract published in this month’s issue of the journal Experimental Eye Research found that cannabinoids may delay retinal degeneration in those with retinitis pigmentosa, an eye disease that often causes blindness.

“Cannabinoids have been demonstrated to exert neuroprotective effects on different types of neuronal insults,” begins the study’s abstract. According to researchers, the goal of the study was to address the theraputic potential of cannabinoids, “ . . . on photoreceptor degeneration, synaptic connectivity and functional activity of the retina in the transgenic P23H rat, an animal model for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (RP).”

Researchers found that; “These results indicate that HU210 [a synthetic cannabinoid] preserves cone and rod structure and function, together with their contacts with postsynaptic neurons, in P23H rats.”

They conclude; “These data suggest that cannabinoids are potentially useful to delay retinal degeneration in RP patients.”

The study was conducted by researchers at the Department of Physiology at the University of Alicante.

About Douglas Slain

Doug received a JD from Stanford Law School, a MA from the University of Chicago, and a BA from DePauw University (Phi Beta Kappa). After practicing real estate and finance law at then Pillsbury, Madison & Sutro, he founded four national monthly law reporting titles now owned by Thomson-Reuters. He served two consecutive terms as chairman of the American Bar Association’s General Practice section’s Professional Responsibility Committee. Slain was an ABA-appointed rule of law consultant to the Ministry of Economy for the Republic of Latvia as its secured transactions adviser. He taught briefly at Stanford Law School as an adjunct clinical law professor. Slain has been the managing partner of Private Placement Advisors since August 2009. In January 2013 he founded Outliers Network.

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